Definition of Tritonis
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The noun Trītōnis is reported to have 1 error(s). Please be cautious when citing this word.
Orthography ID = 2060903
1.
LNS
Trītōnis, Trītōnidis
Tritonia
noun (f., 3rd Greek declension)
  1. of or belonging to Lake Triton
  2. to Pallas
  3. Palladian
  4. Athens
  5. Pallas
Abbreviations
Trītōn, ōnis or ōnos, m., = Τρίτων. Lit., a son of Neptune and the nymph Salacia, a sea-god, who, at the bidding of Neptune, blows through a shell to calm or rouse the sea, Ov. M. 2, 8; 1, 333 sq.; 13, 919; Cic. N. D. 1, 28, 78; 2, 35, 89; Luc. 9, 348; Hyg. Astr. 2, 23 fin.

—Plur.: Tritones, sea-gods that serve the other gods, Verg. A. 5, 824; Plin. 36, 5, 4, § 26.

— Transf. A humorous designation of a lover of fish-ponds: piscinarum Tritones, qs. fish-pond gods, Cic. Att. 2, 9, 1.

— A sea-fish of the genus pelamides, Plin. 32, 11, 53, § 144.

— The name of a ship, Verg. A. 10, 209.

— A river and lake in Africa, near the Lesser Syrtis, where, according to Egypto-Grecian fables, Minerva was born, Mel. 1, 7, 4; Luc. 9, 347; Stat. Th. 2, 722; Claud. IV. Cons. Hon. 36; Sid. Carm. 15, 5.

—Hence, Trītōnius, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Lake Triton, Tritonian: Pallas, Verg. A. 5, 704; also, virgo, id. ib. 11, 483; more freq., absol.: Trītō-nia, ae, f., Minerva, Verg. A. 2, 171; Ov. M. 2, 783; 5, 250; 5, 270; 6, 1; id. F. 6, 655 et saep.

—Also, Trītōnida, ae, Mart. Cap. 9, § 893.

— Trītōniacus, a, um, adj., Tritonian: palus, a miry sea near Pallene, in Macedonia, Ov. M. 15, 358: harundo, i. e. the tibia invented by Pallas, id. ib. 6, 384.

Trītōnis, idis or idos, f. adj., of or belonging to Lake Triton; or, transf., to Pallas, Palladian: palus, Lake Triton, Sil. 3, 322: Pallas, Lucr. 6, 750: arx, the citadel of Pallas, i. e. Athens, Ov. M. 2, 794: urbs, id. ib. 5, 645: pinus, i. e. the ship Argo, built at the suggestion of Pallas, id. H. 6, 47.

—As subst.: Trītōnis, idis or idos, f. Lake Triton, Sil. 9, 297; Stat. Th. 7, 185.

— Pallas, Verg. A. 2, 226; Ov. M. 3, 127; 8, 547: Tritonide fertiles Athenae, i. e. the olive-tree planted by Pallas, Stat. S. 2, 7, 28.
 
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