Definition of navale
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Orthography ID = 2037962
1.
LNS
nāvāle, nāvālis
navalis
noun (n., 3rd pure I-stem declension)
  1. A place where ships were built and repaired, a dock, dockyard
  2. the place in Rome, across the Tiber, where the dock-yards were situated
  3. The requisites for fitting out a ship, tackling, rigging
Abbreviations
nāvālis, e, adj. navis, of or belonging to ships, ship-, naval: pedestres navalesve pugnae, Cic. Sen. 5, 13; Liv. 26, 51, 6: bellum, id. Imp. Pomp. 10, 28: apparatus, id. Att. 10, 8, 3: disciplina et gloria navalis, id. Imp. Pomp. 18, 54: fuga, by sea, Plin. 7, 45, 46, § 148: proelium, Gell. 10, 6, 2: castra, to protect the ships drawn up on land, Caes. B. G. 5, 22: in classe acieque navali esse, Liv. 26, 51, 8 Weissenb.: forma, the shape of a ship, Ov. F. 1, 229: corona, a naval crown, as the reward of a naval victory, Verg. A. 8, 684; cf.: navali coronā solet donari, qui primus in hostium navem armatus transilierit, Paul. ex Fest. p. 163 Mull.; so, navali cinctus honore caput, Ov. A. A. 3, 392: navali surgentes aere columnae, made of the brass from the beaks of captured ships, Verg. G. 3, 29: arbor, fit for ship-building, Plin. 13, 9, 17, § 61: stagnum, a basin in which to exhibit mock sea-fights, Tac. A. 4, 15: navalis Phoebus, so called because hegranted the victory at Actium, Prop. 4 (5), 1, 3; v. Actius and Actiacus: socii, sailors, seamen (chosen from the freedmen of the colonists and allies, and also from those of the colonists and allies themselves who had been in slavery; they were bound to a longer period of service and were of lower rank than the land troops; cf. Liv. 36, 2; 40, 18; 21, 50): postero die militibus navalibusque sociis convocatis, id. 26, 48; 26, 17; 32, 23; 26, 35; 24, 11.

—Sometimes the socii navales are distinguished from the seamen, Liv. 37, 10: navales pedes, contemptuously, galley-slaves, Plaut. Men. 2, 2, 75. (Others understand by this expression ship-servants, cabin-boys. Non. 381, 393, calls the oars themselves navales pedes).

— Duumviri navales, two commissaries who were charged with the repairing and fitting out of a fleet, Liv. 9, 30; 40, 18; 26: navalis scriba, a ship's scribe or secretary, Paul. ex Fest. p. 169 Mull.

— Subst.: nāvā-le, is, n. (in sing. only poet.), and nāvā-lia, ium, n. (gen. plur. navaliorum, Vitr. 5, 127; Inscr. Orell. 3627). A place where ships were built and repaired, a dock, dockyard (cf.: statio, portus): navalia, portus, aquarum ductus, etc., Cic. Off. 2, 17, 60: de navalium opere, id. de Or. 1, 14, 62: deripientque rates alii navalibus, Verg. A. 4, 593; Ov. M. 11, 455.

—In sing., haud aliter quam si siccum navale teneret (puppis), Ov. M. 3, 661; id. H. 18, 207.

—Esp. of the place in Rome, across the Tiber, where the dock-yards were situated, Liv. 3, 26; 8, 14, 12; 40, 51 et saep.

—Near them was the Navalis porta, Paul. ex Fest. p. 178 Mull.

— The requisites for fitting out a ship, tackling, rigging, Liv. 45, 23, 5; Verg. A. 11, 329; Plin. 16, 11, 21, § 52.
 
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