Definition of ecastor, mecastor
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Orthography ID = 2008907
1.
LNS
ecastor
mecastor
Castor, the old e or the me, prefixed; cf.: equidem, edepol; mehercle, medius fiduis, etc., v. Corss. Ausspr. II. p. 856 sq.
interjection
  1. pron. acc
  2. by Castor
  3. Sy
Abbreviations
Castor, oris (acc. to some gramm. Castōris, Quint. 1, 5, 60), m., = Κάστωρ. The son of the Spartan king Tyndarus and Leda, brother of Helena and Pollux, with whom, as twin star (Gemini; hence even Castores, Plin. 10, 43, 60, § 121; 35, 4, 10, § 27; 7, 22, 22, § 86; and: alter Castor, Stat. S. 4, 6, 16), he served as a guide to mariners, Varr. L. L. 5, § 58; Cic. N. D. 2, 2, 6; 3, 18, 45; Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 5; id. Epod. 17, 42; 17, 43; id. C. 4, 5, 35: gaudet equis, id. S. 2, 1, 26; cf. id. C. 1, 12, 25, and Ov. M. 12, 401: ad Castoris (sc. aedem), on the forum, Cic. Mil. 33, 91; where pecuniary affairs were transacted, id. Quint. 4, 17; cf. Juv. 14, 260.

— Derivv. In oaths: ecastor and mecastor the old interj. e or the pron. acc. me, prefixed; cf.: equidem, edepol; mehercle, medius fiduis, etc., v. Corss. Ausspr. II. p. 856 sq., by Castor, an oath in very frequent use, especially by women, though not exclusively by them, as asserted by Gell. 11, 6, 1, and Charis. p. 183 P.; cf. Plaut. As. 5, 2, 46; 5, 2, 80; id. Cas. 5, 4, 13: ecastor, re experior, quanti facias uxorem tuam, id. Am. 1, 3, 10; 1, 3, 39; id. Cist. 4, 2, 61; id. Truc. 2, 5, 28; id. Poen. 1, 2, 71; id. Stich. 1, 3, 89; id. As. 1, 3, 36; id. Truc. 2, 2, 60; id. As. 3, 1, 30; id. Stich. 1, 3, 81: ecastor vero, id. Merc. 4, 1, 25: per ecastor scitus (i. e. perscitus ecastor) puer est natus Pamphilo, Ter. And. 3, 2, 6: nec nunc mecastor quid hero ego dicam queo comminisci, Plaut. Aul, 1, 1, 28; cf. id. Merc. 4, 1, 6; id. Cas. 2, 3, 30; id. Men. 4, 2, 50; id. Mil. 1, 1, 63; cf. also id. Stich. 1, 3, 86; id. Truc. 2, 2, 36; 2, 7, 30; 3, 2, 11; 4, 4, 9; 5, 1, 26: Sy. Salve, mecastor, Parmenio. Pa. Et tu, edepol, Syra, Ter. Hec. 1, 2, 8 Don.

— Ad Castoris or Locus Ca-storum, nom. propr., a place in Upper Italy, between Cremona and Bedriacum, where stood a shrine of Castor and Pollux, Suet. Oth. 9; Tac. H. 2, 24.

— Castoreus, a, um, adj. of Castor: manus, Sen. Hippol. 810.

— A companion of Aeneas, Verg. A. 10, 124.

— The grandson of king Deiotarus, Cic. Deiot. 1, 2, 10; 1, 2, 28 sq.

— Castor Tarcondarius, a chieftain of Gallograecia, ally of Pompey, Caes. B. C. 3, 4.

— Antonius Castor, an author on botany, Plin. 25, 17, 66, § 174; 25, 2, 5, § 9.
 
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