Definition of acceptus
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Orthography ID = 2000441
1.
LNS
acceptus, accepta, acceptum
accipio
adjective (2-1-2)
  1. welcome, agreeable, acceptable
Abbreviations
ac-cipio, cēpi, ceptum, 3, v. a. (fut. perf. accepso = accepero, Pac. ap. Non. 74, 31, or Rib. Trag. Rel. 118) [capio], to accept. In gen., to take a person or thing to one's self: leno ad se accipiet hominem et aurum, will take the man and his money to himself (into his house), Plaut. Poen. 1, 1, 51. Of things received by the hand, to take, receive: cette manus vestras measque accipite, Enn. ap. Non. 85, 1 (Trag. v. 320 ed. Vahl.): ex tua accepi manu pateram, Plaut. Amph. 2, 2, 132; hence, trop. of the word given, the promise, with which a grasping of the hand was usually connected: accipe daque fidem, Enn. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1 (Ann. v. 33 ed. Vahl.; so in the Gr. πιστὰ δοῦναι καὶ λαβεῖν); cf. Plaut. Trin. 2, 4, 87; so Verg. A. 8, 150; in Ter. of a person to be protected: hanc (virginem) accepi, acceptam servabo, Ter. And. 1, 5, 62; cf. Cic. Fam. 7, 5, and Sall. C. 6, 5,

— Of things received or taken by different parts of the body: accipite hoc onus in vestros collos, Cato ap. Non. 200, 23: gremio, Verg. A. 1, 685: oculis aut pectore noctem (i. e. somnum), id. ib. 4, 531.

— In gen., very freq., as implying action, to take, to take possession of, to accept (Gr. δέχεσθαι); of something that falls to one's share, to get, to receive, to be the recipient of (Gr. λαμβάνειν).

— To take, accept: hanc epistulam accipe a me, take this letter from me, Plaut. Ps. 2, 2, 52; 4, 2, 26; cf. id. Ep. 3, 4, 26: persuasit aliis, ut pecuniam accipere mallent, Cic. Off. 2, 23, 82: condicionem pacis, Caes. B. G. 2, 15: armis obsidibusque acceptis Crassus profectus est, after he had taken into his possession the arms and hostages, id. ib. 3, 23: divitias, Nep. Epam. 4, 3: aliquid a patre, to inherit, id. Timoth. 1, 1; id. Att. 1: accipe et haec, manuum tibi quae monumenta mearum sint, Verg. A. 3, 486 al.

—Hence to receive or entertain as guest: haec (tellus) fessos placidissima portu accipit, Verg. A. 3, 78: Laurentes nymphae, accipite Aenean, id. ib. 8, 71; 155; Ov. M. 8, 655 al.

—Of admittance to political privileges: Nomentani et Pedani in civitatem accepti, Liv. 8, 14; cf. Cic. Off. 1, 11, 35: magnifice volo summos viros accipere, Plaut. Ps. 1, 2, 34: in loco festivo sumus festive accepti, id. ib. 5, 19; so id. Cist. 1, 1, 12; id. Men. 5, 2, 44; id. Pers. 1, 1, 32, etc.; Ter. Eun. 5, 9, 52; Lucr. 3, 907; Cic. Att. 16, 6; Ov. F. 2, 725 al.

—Hence also ironically, to entertain, to treat, deal with: ego te miseris jam accipiam modis, Plaut. Aul. 4, 4, 3: hominem accipiam quibus dictis maeret, id. Men. 5, 1, 7: indignis acceptus modis, Ter. Ad. 2, 1, 12. Perh. also Lucil. ap. Non. 521, 1: adeo male me accipiunt decimae, treat or use me ill, deal harshly with me; and ib. 240, 8: sic, inquam, veteratorem illum vetulum lupum Hannibalem acceptum (Non. explains the latter in a very unusual manner, by deceptum).

— To get, to receive, to be the recipient of, Pac. ap. Non. 74, 31; Lucr. 1, 819, 909; 2, 762, 885, 1009: ictus, id. 4, 1048 (cf. Verg. A. 3, 243: vulnera accipiunt tergo): aridior nubes accipit ignem, takes or catches fire, Lucr. 6, 150; Caes. B. G. 1, 48: humanitatem iis tribuere debemus, a quibus accepimus, Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 9: pecuniam ob rem judicandam, Cic. Verr. 1, 38: luna lumen solis accipit, id. de Or. 3, 45; cf. Hor. Ep. 1, 10, 17: praeclarum accepimus a majoribus morem, Cic. Off. 3, 10, 44: praecepta, Caes. B. G. 2, 6: accepi tuas litteras (in another sense than above), I have received your letter, it has reached me (allatae sunt ad me), Cic. Fam. 1, 9, 14; 2, 1, 1; 10, 1 al.: acceptā injuriā ignoscere quam persequi malebant, Sall. C. 9, 3; Caes. B. G. 2, 33: calamitatem, ib. 1, 31: detrimenta, ib. 5, 22; cf. Cic. Mur. 21, 44 al. So often of dignities and offices: provinciam, id. Fam. 2, 10, 2: consulatum, Suet. Aug. 10: Galliam, id. Caes. 22 al. In partic. To take a thing by hearing, i. e., To hear, to perceive, to observe, to learn (cf. opp. do = I give in words, i. e. I say): hoc simul accipe dictum, Enn. ap. Cic. Off. 1, 12, 38 (Ann. v. 204): quod ego inaudivi, accipite, Pac. ap. Non. 126, 22 (Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 81): hoc etiam accipe quod dico, Lucil. ap. Non. 240, 1: carmen auribus, Lucr. 4, 983 (so id. 6, 164); 1, 270; cf. Verg. A. 2, 65: voces, Lucr. 4, 613 (so 6, 171): si te aequo animo ferre accipiet, Ter. And. 2, 3, 23: quae gerantur, accipies ex Pollione, Cic. Fam. 1, 6; 1, 9, 4; Liv. 1, 7.

—Hence very freq. in the histt., to get or receive intelligence of any thing, to learn: urbem Romam, sicuti ego accepi, condidere atque habuere initio Trojani, as I have learned, Sall. C. 6, 1, and so al.

— To comprehend or understand any thing communicated: haud satis meo corde accepi querelas tuas, Plaut. Cas. 2, 2, 18: et si quis est, qui haec putet arte accipi posse, Cic. de Or. 1, 25, 114: ut non solum celeriter acciperet, quae tradebantur, etc., Nep. Att. 1, 3; so Quint. 1, 3, 3; 2, 9, 3 al.

— With the accessory idea of judging, to take a thing thus or thus, to interpret or explain, usually constr. with ad or in c. acc.: quibus res sunt minus secundae . . . ad contumeliam omnia accipiunt magis, the more unfortunate one is, the more inclined is he to regard every thing as an insult, Ter. Ad. 4, 3, 15: in eam partem accipio, id. Eun. 5, 2, 37; cf. Cic. Fam. 10, 6; id. Att. 16, 6; Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 2: non recte accipis, you put a wrong construction upon this, id. And. 2, 2, 30: quae sibi quisque facilia factu putat, aequo animo accipit, Sall. C. 3, 2.

— Hence: accipere aliquid omen, or in omen, to regard a thing as a (favorable) omen, to accept the omen (cf. δέχεσθαι τὸν οἰωνόν), Cic. Div. 1, 46, 103; 2, 40, 83; Liv. 1, 7, 11; 21, 63 fin.; Tac. H. 1, 62; id. A. 1, 28; 2, 13; Flor. 4, 12, 14 al.

—Hence poet.: accipio agnoscoque deos, Verg. A. 12, 260; cf. Ov. M. 7, 620.

— To take a thing upon one's self, to undertake (syn. suscipio): accipito hanc ad te litem, Plaut. Most. 5, 2, 23: meā causā causam accipite, Ter. Hec. alt. prol. 47; cf. Cic. Fam. 7, 24; so Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 22; Quint. 20 al.

—Hence also, To bear, endure, suffer any thing disagreeable or troublesome: hanccine ego ut contumeliam tam insignem ad me accipiam! Ter. Eun. 4, 7, 1: nil satis firmi video, quamobrem accipere hunc me expediat metum, id. Heaut. 2, 3, 96; 5, 1, 59; id. Eun. 4, 6, 24; id. Ad. 2, 1, 53; id. Ph. 5, 2, 4; Cic. Tusc. 5, 19, 56: calamitatem, id. Off. 3, 26: injuriam, id. ib. 1, 11 al.

— To accept a thing, to be satisfied with, to approve: dos, Pamphile, est decem talenta; Pam.: Accipio, Ter. And. 5, 4, 48: accepit condicionem, dein quaestum accipit, id. ib. 1, 1, 52: visa ista ... accipio iisque interdum etiam assentior, nec percipio tamen, Cic. Ac. 2, 20, 66: preces suas acceptas ab dis immortalibus ominati, Liv. 42, 30, 8 Drak. Cf. Herz, Caes. B. G. 5, 1: “equi te esse feri similem, dico.” Ridemus et ipse Messius: “accipio.” I allow it, Exactly so, Hor. S. 1, 5, 58.

— In mercant. lang., t. t., to receive or collect a sum: pro quo (frumento) cum a Varinio praetore pecuniam accepisset, Cic. Fl. 45; hence subst.: acceptum, i, n., the receipt, and in account-books the credit side: in acceptum referre alicui, to carry over to the credit side, to place to one's credit, Cic. Verr. 1, 36, 57; id. Rosc. Com. 2; id. Phil. 2, 16; id. Caec. 6, 17; Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 234 (opp. datum or expensum).

—Hence also trop., to owe or be indebted to one, in a good or a bad sense: ut esset nemo qui non mihi vitam suam, liberos, remp. referret acceptam, Cic. Phil. 2, 5: omnia mala, quae postea vidimus, uni accepta referemus Antonio, ascribe, id. ib. 22; Caes. B. G. 8, 58; id. B. C, 3, 57: Acceptum refero versibus, esse nocens, Ov. Trist. 2, 10.

— In the gram m., to take a word or phrase thus or thus, to explain a word in any manner: adversus interdum promiscue accipitur, Charis. p. 207 P. al.

—(Syn. nanciscor and adipiscor: he to whom something is given, accipit; he who gets by a fortunate occurrence, nanciscitur; he who obtains it by exertion, adipiscitur. “Sumimus ipsi: accipimus ab alio,” Vel. Long. p. 2243 P.

—“Inter tenere, sumere et accipere hoc interest, quod tenemus quae sunt in nostra potestate: sumimus posita: accipimus data,” Isid. Diff. 1).

Hence, acceptus, a, um, P. a., welcome, agreeable, acceptable (syn. gratus. Acceptus is related to gratus, as the effect to the cause; he who is gratus, i. e. dear, is on that account acceptus, welcome, acceptable; hence the usual position: gratus atque acceptus).

—First, of persons: essetne apud te is servus acceptissimus? Plaut. Cap. 3, 5, 56: plebi acceptus erat, Caes. B. G. 1, 13; acceptus erat in oculis, Vulg. 1 Reg. 18, 5.

— Of things: dis et hominibus est acceptum quod, etc., Varr. R. R. 3, 16, 5: quod vero approbaris. id gratum acceptumque habendum, Cic. Tusc. 5, 15, 45: munus eorum gratum acceptumque esse, Nep. Hann. 7, 3: quorum mihi dona accepta et grata habeo, Plaut. Truc. 2, 7, 56: rem populo Romano gratam acceptamque, Cic. Phil. 13, 50; tempore accepto exaudivi, Vulg. 2 Cor. 6, 2.

—Comp., Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 96; Cic. Rep. 6, 13; Tac. A. 6, 45 al.

—Sup., see above.

—Adv. accepte does not occur.
 
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