Definition of accedo
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Orthography ID = 2000386
1.
LNS
accēdō, accēdere, accessī, accessus
accedo
verb (3rd conjugation)
  1. to go or come to or near, to approach
  2. adverbs, infin
  3. To approach a thing in a hostilemanner, to attack
  4. to come near to, to approach
  5. To come to or upon, to happen to, to befall
  6. to be added
Abbreviations
ac-cēdo, cessi, cessum, 3, v. n. (perf. sync., accēstis, Verg. A. 1, 201), to go or come to or near, to approach (class.). Lit. In gen., constr. with ad, in, the local adverbs, the acc., dat., infin., or absol. With ad: accedam ad hominem, Plaut. Mil. 2, 6, 14; so, ad aedīs, id. Amph. 1, 1, 108: ad flammam, Ter. Andr. 1, 1, 103: omnīs ad aras, to beset every altar, Lucr. 5, 1199: ad oppidum, Caes. B. G. 2, 13: ad ludos, Cic. Pis. 27, 65: ad Caesarem supplex, id. Fam. 4, 4, 3: ad manum, to come to their hands (of fishes), id. Att. 2, 1, 7: ad Aquinum, id. Phil. 2, 41, 106; so, ad Heracleam, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 49, § 129.

—Impers.: ad eas (oleas) cum accederetur, Cic. Caecin. 8, 22.

— With in: ne in aedīs accederes, Cic. Caecin. 13, 36: in senatum, id. Att. 7, 4, 1: in Macedoniam, id. Phil. 10, 6: in funus aliorum, to join a funeral procession, id. Leg. 2, 26, 66 al.

— With local adv.: eodem pacto, quo huc accessi, abscessero, Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 84: illo, Cic. Caecin. 16, 46: quo, Sall. J. 14, 17.

— With acc. (so, except the names of localities, only in poets and historians, but not in Caesar and Livy): juvat integros accedere fontīs atque haurire, Lucr. 1, 927, and 4, 2: Scyllaeam rabiem scopulosque, Verg. A. 1, 201: Sicanios portus, Sil. 14, 3; cf. id. 6, 604: Africam, Nep. Hann. 8: aliquem, Sall. J. 18, 9; 62, 1; Tac. H. 3, 24: classis Ostia cum magno commeatu accessit, Liv. 22, 37, 1: Carthaginem, Plin. Ep. 7, 27, 3.

—(ε) With dat. (poet.): delubris, Ov. M. 15, 745: silvis, id. ib. 5, 674: caelo (i. e. to become a god), id. ib. 15, 818, and 870.

—(* ζ) With inf.: dum constanter accedo decerpere (rosas), App. M. 4, p. 143 med.

—(η) Absol.: accedam atque hanc appellabo, Plaut. Am. 1, 3, 17: deici nullo modo potuisse qui non accesserit, Cic. Caecin. 13, 36: accessit propius, ib. 8, 22: quoties voluit blandis accedere dictis, Ov. M. 3, 375 al.

—Impers.: non potis accedi, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 16, 38 (Trag. v. 17 ed. Vahl.): quod eā proxime accedi poterat, Cic. Caecin. 8, 21. In partic. To approach a thing in a hostilemanner (like aggredior, adorior), to attack: acie instructa usque ad castra hostium accessit, Caes. B. G. 1, 51: sese propediem cum magno exercitu ad urbem accessurum, Sall. C. 32 fin.: ad manum, to fight hand to hand, to engage in close combat, Nep. Eum. 5, 2; Liv. 2, 30, 12: ad corpus alicujus, Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 2, 2: Atque accedit muros Romana juventus, Enn. ap. Gell. 10, 29 (Ann. v. 527 ed. Vahl.): hostīs accedere ventis navibus velivolis, id. ap. Macr. S. 6, 5 (Ann. v. 380 ib.); and, in malam part., Ter. Heaut. 3, 3, 22.

— Mercant. t. t.: accedere ad hastam, to attend an auction, Nep. Att. 6, 3; Liv. 43, 16, 2.

— In late Lat.: ad manus (different from ad manum, B. 1), to be admitted to kiss hands, Capit. Maxim. 5. Fig. In gen., to come near to, to approach: haud invito ad aurīs sermo mi accessit, Ter. Hec. 3, 5, 32; so, clemens quidam sonus aurīs ejus accedit, App. M. 5, p. 160: si somnus non accessit, Cels. 3, 18; cf.: febris accedit, id. 3, 3 sq.: ubi accedent anni, Hor. S. 2, 2, 85; cf.: accedente senectā, id. Ep. 2, 2, 211. In partic. To come to or upon one, to happen to, to befall (a meaning in which it approaches so near to accido that in many passages it has been proposed to change it to the latter; cf. Ruhnk. Rut. Lup. 1, p. 3; 2, p. 96; Dictat. in Ter. p. 222 and 225); constr. with ad or (more usually) with dat.: voluntas vostra si ad poetam accesserit, Ter. Phorm. prol. 29: num tibi stultitia accessit? have you become a fool? Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 77: paulum vobis accessit pecuniae, Ter. Hec. 3, 5, 56: dolor accessit bonis viris, virtus non est imminuta, Cic. Att. 1, 16, 9: quo plus sibi aetatis accederet, id. de Or. 1, 60, 254 al. With the accessory idea of increase, to be added = addi; constr. with ad or dat.: primum facie (i. e. faciei) quod honestas accedit, Lucil. ap. Gell. 1, 14; so ap. Non. 35, 20: ad virtutis summam accedere nihil potest, Cic. Fin. 4, 24: Cassio animus accessit, id. Att. 5, 20; 7, 3; id. Clu. 60 al.: pretium agris, the price increases, advances, Plin. Ep. 6, 19, 1.

—Absol.: plura accedere debent, Lucr. 2, 1129: accedit mors, Cic. Fin. 1, 18, 60; id. de Or. 2, 17, 73: quae jacerent in tenebris omnia, nisi litterarum lumen accederet, id. Arch. 6, 14 (so, not accenderet, is to be read).

—If a new thought is to be added, it is expressed by accedit with quod (add to this, that, etc.) when it implies a logical reason, but with ut (beside this, it happens that, or it occurs that) when it implies an historical fact (cf. Zumpt, § 621 and 626): accedit enim, quod patrem amo, Cic. Att. 13, 21: so Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 2; Cic. Rosc. Am. 8, 22; id. Att. 1, 92 al.; Caes. B. G. 3, 2; 4, 16; Sall. C. 11, 5; on the other hand: huc accedit uti, etc., Lucr. 1, 192, 215, 265 al.: ad App. Claudii senectutem accedebat etiam ut caecus esset, Cic. de Sen. 6, 16; so id. Tusc. 1, 19, 43; id. Rosc. Am. 31, 86; id. Deiot. 1, 2; Caes. B. G. 3, 13; 5, 16 al. When several new ideas are added, they are introduced by res in the plur.: cum ad has suspiciones certissimae res accederent: quod per fines Sequanorum Helvetios transduxisset; quod obsides inter eos dandos curāsset; quod ea omnia, etc., Caes. B. G. 1, 19. Sometimes the historical idea follows accedit, without ut: ad haec mala hoc mihi accedit etiam: haec Andria ... gravida e Pamphilo est, Ter. Andr. 1, 3, 11: accedit illud: si maneo ... cadendum est in unius potestatem, Cic. Att. 8, 3, 1. To give assent to, accede to, assent to, to agree with, to approve of; constr. with ad or dat. (with persons only, with dat.): accessit animus ad meam sententiam, Plaut. Aul. 2, 7, 13; so Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 28, § 69; Nep. Milt. 3, 5: Galba speciosiora suadentibus accessit, Tac. H. 1, 34; so Quint. 9, 4, 2 al. To come near to in resemblance, to resemble, be like; with ad or dat. (the latter most freq., esp. after Cic.): homines ad Deos nulla re propius accedunt quam salutem hominibus dando, Cic. Lig. 12: Antonio Philippus proximus accedebat, id. Brut. 147; cf. Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 3; id. de Or. 1, 62, 263; id. Ac. 2, 11, 36 al. To enter upon, to undertake; constr. with ad or in: in eandem infamiam, Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 84: ad bellorum pericula, Cic. Balb. 10: ad poenam, to undertake the infliction of punishment, id. Off. 1, 25, 89: ad amicitiam Caesaris, Caes. B. C. 1, 48: ad vectiǵalia, to undertake their collection as contractor, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 42: ad causam, the direction of a lawsuit, id. ib. 2, 2, 38; id. de Or. 1, 38, 175 al. But esp.: ad rem publicam, to enter upon the service of the state, Cic. Off. 1, 9, 28; id. Rosc. Am. 1 al.
 
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